Pre-Licensing Proctor Information


The Texas Real Estate Commission (TREC) requires the final course exam for all of the 30 hour Pre-Licensing courses to be a proctored exam . Students select and arrange for their proctor for the Pre-Licensing courses.

        


Selecting a Proctor

  1. Students will select a proctor. Qualified proctors are disinterested parties. A disinterested party is a person that would not be likely to assist the student.

  2. Good examples of disinterested parties are school librarian, teachers, clergy or a local testing center.

  3. Poor examples of disinterested parties are relatives, friends and co-workers.

Proctor Method

  1. After the course has been completed, the Proctored Exam icon will become accessible on the student dashboard.

  2. When ready to begin the exam, click on the Proctored Exam icon and a form will pop up. Both the proctor and student must read and complete the form.

  3. After submitting the form, the exam will become accessible. Be prepared to begin the exam without distractions.

  4. By state law, the exam is multiple choice and a passing score is 70%.

  5. Upon completion of the exam, you will get your results immediately.

  6. Certificates will be emailed to students within 7 days or sooner upon request.

SAE Courses Proctor Information


The Texas Real Estate Commission (TREC) requires the final course exam for all of the 30 hour SAE courses to be a proctored exam . Students schedule their proctored exam while logged into their course.

        


Proctor Method

  1. Students login to their course at the pre-arranged time and follow the steps online.

  2. By state law, the exam is multiple choice and a passing score is 70%.

  3. Upon completion of the exam, you will get your results immediately.

  4. Certificates will be emailed to students within 7 days or sooner upon request.

The Texas Real Estate Commission rules allow students to take the course final exam two times. The second exam must be completed within 30 days of completing the course.

If the second exam is not successfully completed, Texas law requires students to re-take the course before registering to take the exam again.